While getting some fresh air and fun physical activities are important, outdoor fun can also have the added benefit of enabling children to develop important motor skills that will serve them for a lifetime. From tying their laces, to getting up out of bed, to brushing their teeth, to maintaining their balance, to putting pencil to paper, to developing good eye-hand coordination, motor skills are important to any developing child.

Read on to learn about springtime outdoor activities to help your child develop motor skills. These activities are so fun, in fact, that you might have trouble getting them to come back inside!

  1. Plant a Garden

Kids love getting their hands dirty. And when it comes to helping to create a flower, vegetable, or herb garden, your child will develop motor skills without having the whole process feel like work. When you’re out planting flowers with your child, you can take the time to explain important lessons such as the process of pollination — and the role that bees play — so that your child can understand how a seed ends up becoming a beautiful flower.

  1. Shells & the Beach

If you can make it to the beach, a great activity to help your child develop motor skills is letting him or her collect sea shells on the sea shore and then organize or sort the shells in groups or make patterns. If you can’t get shells, then using small stones or rocks will do nicely.

  1. Hill Climbing

A great spring outdoor activity to help your child develop motor skills is hill climbing. Your little one will love climbing and descending hills, which will build his or her strength and balance. The hillier the hills, the better since an uneven surface will provide your child with a greater challenge.

  1. Outdoor Play

Whether playing catch, kicking a ball back and forth, or playing tag, there are lots of fun physical activities that will help your child to develop motor skills while he or she has fun. These activities build strength, balance, coordination, endurance, flexibility, and more.

  1. Spring Cleaning

While many adults might prefer just about any activity over spring cleaning, children look forward to the challenge of beautifying the backyard. Of course, you’ll have to give your child tasks that are realistic to to his or her age and strength, but there are plenty of tasks that your child can shoulder. For instance, he or she may be able to help with raking up leaves or organizing the garage. Even a small role will help your child develop motor skills.

 

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Naomi Shaw DrGreene.com contributor

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